Heaven is Home

Log Line
When a flood devastates a small rural town, a mysterious drifter appears and helps rebuild the community’s trust in each other and their faith in God.

Script Info
Script Type: Feature
Genre: Family
Est. Budget: Less than $3M

Screenplay Synopsis
Open on Main Street in rural Heaven, Louisiana, where displaced community leaders and citizens pick through the remnants of damaged businesses and century-old homes trying to salvage their belongings and upended lives. Mayor John Spencer, diligently works his way toward the front doors of City Hall, where council member and friend Howard Torrington, helps clear away broken tree limbs and trash from the storm. Nearby, John’s wife of twenty-five years, Janet Spencer, carries damaged files out of her insurance office, dumping them in an oversize trash bin.  Daughter Abbey, 17, appears at her side with an armful of the same, filling the container. Later that evening, the family sits quietly at home, where son Jake, 15,  tells his parents the entire football team is pitching in with the clean-up around town. John and Janet smile, weary, almost too tired to care anymore. Daughter Lilly, 8, complains “it feels different at school”.

The next day John and several members of their congregation try to help the church pastor remove downed trees, an overturned car, and other remnants of the storm. The flood was so devastating it literally covered the entire community under water. A drifter now appears, he’s young, maybe age 30, a bit shaggy, bearded with long unkempt hair. John and the others welcome him with a sense of caution. The drifter eagerly volunteers to help the others. When asked where he comes from, he really doesn’t have a satisfactory answer. Howard tells John they should feed him and send him on his way, but John sees something familiar in the young man, maybe a little of his own past. The others are surprised when the drifter suddenly pushes one of their own out of the way of a falling tree limb, narrowly avoiding harm – or death. The drifter appears the next day at the local pharmacy and helps the owner repair several of his glass windows. Now he’s at the grocery store helping repair the big freezer units. Somehow he has knowledge of all things that need repaired.

The community leaders learn the drifter is sleeping in the city park. They offer him shelter, he accepts their generosity. Soon, others in town are talking about the stranger, everyone has an idea where he might be from, but no one really knows. He begins to overhear many of the townspeople complaining about their plight. Several begin to turn on each other, bringing up underlying prejudices, fostering distrust among themselves. The drifter speaks with these individuals and encourages them to resolve their past differences. He begins to mend old rivalries and to heal new wounds. He seems to shine when others wane to the side. The pastor and his congregation begin to see changes in their lives. They begin to respect and admire the efforts of their new ‘friend’.

As the community begins to grow closer, the drifter begins to feel confused.  He had purpose when he arrived and now he feels a tugging to move on.  He would like to stay, he’s weary of traveling.  One night he asks God, why can’t he stay in Heaven?  There is no answer, only a rustling of trees, a warm wind and now a soft golden light that cloaks him, he feels a strong urge to keep moving.

The next morning the drifter is gone.  Everyone is so busy going about their day, they barely notice the renewed spirit of friendship and faith the drifter has inspired.  Most don’t realize he’s absent.  Except Lilly, who begins to think the drifter was really an angel from heaven – sent to Heaven.  John and Janet are skeptical of course, until they witnesses the drifter’s final miracle: a beautiful vibrant rainbow that fills the entire sky from corner to corner, stretching from the center of town and reaching upwards into the orange tinged clouds laying overhead and beyond. A sure sign of God's enduring love.

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